The prototype is finish!

The new ILC1-1/8 control board works fine! Great!
I describe the circuit later …

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The tube: ILC 1-1/8 – Updated!

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Here is a detailed description of the tube.
The Filament voltage is 3.15V (150 mA). You have pins 1,2 (+) and 14,15 (-) to use. It’s not necessary to use both couple, 1 or 2 and 14 or 15 are enough.
(It’s also possible to use AC for the filament.)

The next is our Grid voltage, +20V (45mA .. 50mA). The Grid are the pins 4, 8 and 13 (one of these).

The other pins are the segments. To use with +20V too. Each segment needs 3mA .. 4mA current.

Annotaion:
It’s possible to reduce the Grid and segment voltage down to 12V. The segments are still on, but not so bright. For test it’s great!

An example:
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Programming my own Atmega168

Awful!
The IV-18 Project is actually finished. The only thing that is not so nice, I use an Arduino Nano for control. For a long time I bought some Atmega168 microcontroller to programming this and to use it instead of the Arduino Nano.
Yesterday it was now ready, I dealt with the programming of Atmega168 via Arduino UNO. It was tearing the hair. I found a lot of pages in the internet (sometimes I have more than 20 pages open at the same time). But I got still errors.
In the evening it was time to say: Goal reached!
Now, I’m able to programming my own Atmega168 microcontroller and use it in my circuits.
In the next days I will share my knowledge and I will create a new page with all the necessary informations.

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In this video I show you the possibility to control an 8 x 7 Segment Display with the Arduino. You need only three wires to control the display.
In this demonstration I use a simple source code to generate a random number and display this number at a random digit.

Photographing water drops using Raspberry Pi

I finished the next part of another project: water drops photography.

There are a lot of amazing photos about this theme. I decided to try this self. I started with a simple equipment. First with an injection set, a flash light and a lot of time! The result was great! The next step was to buy a light barrier to trigger the camera and a solenoid valve to produce the water drops. The solenoid valve is already controled by the Raspberry Pi.
Now, I removed the light barrier and trigger the camera with the Raspberry Pi too.
This is the current state.

In the next days I will show you the circuit and the python sketch.Image